3 Best Electric Scooters For Young Children

Is your kid under the age of 10 and begging your for their own electric scooter? If you’re like most parents, you probably have no idea what to look for in a scooter for a child.

Don’t worry! I’ve done the research for you and compiled a list of 3 great electric scooters for young children.

Before you even consider getting your child an electric scooter, there are a few things to know. Read ahead to find out!

Scooters Can Be Ridden By Almost Anyone

Scooters can be ridden by some very young children. It really depends on their coordination level and ability to ride. I know some kids who shouldn’t come within 10 feet of an electric scooter, let alone ride one! However, you also see really little kids riding around on mini dirt bikes! They clearly are far more advanced. Know your kid before you ever think about getting them a scooter. This goes for friends/aunts/uncles/grandparents. They should check with you first before ever considering getting a young child an electric scooter.

The last thing you want to do is get a scooter that your kid is going to find boring. You don’t want to get something meant for a child a few years younger. Remember your kid is going to grow into the scooter so you want to make sure that the scooter can “grow” with them. That means having enough power to carry that child as they get older and heavier. This is discussed below as well, but just make sure that your kid’s weight doesn’t exceed his/her scooter’s recommended maximum weight. They can still ride the scooter, but it won’t go as fast and it won’t be able to be ridden for as long.

Christmas/Birthday Gift

If someone does want to give an electric scooter as a special present for the child’s birthday or maybe at Christmas, there are a few things you need to know before the big day arrives.  Make sure that if someone else is giving an electric scooter to your child that they know these few things before bringing it over on the big day.

First, assembly is generally pretty quick and easy. The scooters below should be assembled in less than 10-15 minutes, even for the most mechanically-challenged parent. Many scooters don’t require any tools at all for assembly, and most of the time all it usually takes is an allen wrench. Some scooters might come with the proper tool for assembly, but most don’t. Be sure to have the needed tool(s) on hand when assembling a scooter in a time crunch. Just make sure you read the outside of the box (where it will tell you what you need) and prepare accordingly.

The biggest knowledge nugget to know, though, is that after the scooter has been assembled it needs to have a solid charge before anyone takes it for a ride. Not just charged, but charged overnight. Most scooter manufacturers will recommend at least a 12-hour overnight charge before first usage.  There’s nothing worse than having the kid unwrap their new electric scooter only to find out they can’t ride it til the next day. So make sure it’s charging in a hidden spot so that the “birthday” boy or girl doesn’t get their surprise spoiled too early.

Safety

Before we go any further, let’s address the very important issue of safety.  Just like skateboards and bicycles, electric scooters are a frequent cause of childhood injuries as serious as broken arms and as mild as an elbow scrape. Any child who gets on any type of “vehicle” that they can potentially fall off of going at more than a few miles an hour should be be wearing protective gear. At the very least I’d recommend a good-fitting helmet. Depending on the kid and the scooter, you also may want to get some good-quality protective elbow and knee pads.

I emphasize “good-fitting” when talking about helmets. Buying a kid a too-big helmet may be more economical because you know they will grow into it. However that won’t be much consolation when they get a head injury in that first spill when that ill-fitting helmet flies off their head at first contact with the ground.

Good elbow and knee pads are also highly recommended because kids are going to absolutely fall off the bike and onto the sharp bendy points of their arms and legs.  If they’re like most kids, they probably already have protective pads of some kind. Typically if he/she has an electric scooter, they either have (or will have) additional little vehicles like a bike or a skateboard. Those pads can be used across multiple hobbies and last for a while.

Make sure your child always wears proper shoes, like sneakers or other solid-soled shoes, when they ride the scooter. Don’t ever let them ride it with just sandals or in their bare feet. The deck they stand on is right on top of the battery and this could heat the deck to very uncomfortable levels if they ride for a long time.  This could ultimately blister the feet. Also, if they do need to hop off the scooter quickly, their feet will be at high risk of injury skidding off concrete or asphalt.

Does your kid also need gloves? How about eye wear to protect their eyes? That totally depends on how your kid rides the scooter and how accident-prone they are. Some kids don’t really need any protection while others should be encased in bubble wrap.

Also keep in mind that these scooters are not meant to be ridden in the rain or when there are wet spots on the pavement/sidewalks. The traction on these wheels are not good enough to keep going in these conditions. Also be mindful that these scooters do not come with any lights. While you could add a small LED headlight to the front of the handlebars, these scooters should never be ridden in night conditions or when there is very poor visibility.

Where To Ride

For small kids, there’s some basic rules on where they should ride their electric scooter. They should always ride with a parent, or other responsible adult, present.  Kids without supervision are more likely to attempt things on a scooter that they shouldn’t.

The kind of surface matters a great deal on an electric scooter. Flat, clean surfaces are a must. A school or church parking lot is a great and safe place for a kid to tool around on their scooter. They also have the added benefit of having long stretches of time where no one is present so your kid can enjoy some privacy while they learn how to use their scooter.

Some kids may have a local park or a very quiet street in front of their house where they can ride. Still, parental or guardian supervision needs to be close by.

There is a possibility that you could also take your kid to a local skate park to ride this scooter. Keep in mind that most of the kids there are going to be much faster and more skilled on whatever they ride. Electric scooters can be used with caution in these skate parks as long as the kid rider doesn’t attempt steep hills or jumps. These parks are really only recommended once your kid is a skilled rider who can handle their scooter reasonably well.

Charging The Battery

After every day of riding you should charge the battery. Most scooters and batteries are set to be charged for up to a 12-hour period without any damage to the battery. This way you can simply plug the scooter in at night when your child comes in for the day.

You should not leave the battery charging to your child initially. They should know how their battery gets charged, but you will need to make sure that the correct process (as outlined in the owner’s manual) is followed.

It’s also important to make sure that the battery is charged periodically even if it isn’t being ridden. Maybe it’s winter and there’s no chance of being able to get out on an electric scooter for months. Plug that charger in every few weeks for a charge to keep the battery healthy. Leaving a battery to run down over the course of months may result in a damaged battery that will need to be replaced.

Scooter Maintenance

You may worry about how easily broken a child’s electric scooter can be. Just like a bicycle, the odds that your kid could break their scooter increases with age and strength. That’s one good reason to make sure you get an electric scooter that is at, or above, their current abilities.

Make sure to keep the scooter clean by washing it down occasionally with a hose when it gets dirty. Inspect the wiring connections, especially with the brakes. Lubricate all the moving parts weekly to keep everything running smoothly.

A properly maintained electric scooter should be able to last years. These are not cheaply-made toys that are going to break down quickly. At the very least, an electric scooter for one child could be passed down to younger children as time goes by.

Okay, now that we’ve gotten all the nitty-gritty out of the way, let’s take a look at 3 kid-friends electric scooters! These three scooters all have their good points, but ultimately each one is intended for a slightly different rider.

 

Razor PowerCore E90

The Razor E90 is one of the smallest electric scooters on the market. What makes it great for little kids in riding it is that you have to start the motor by pushing the scooter to a speed of at least 3 mph. If you’re too small or weak to push the scooter forward with one foot while the other is on the deck, then you’ll never start this scooter.

The owner’s manual for the E90 recommends that the minimum riding age should be 8 years old. However, we know that this totally depends on the kid. There are 5 year old that could ride this scooter, but there could also could be 10 year old who shouldn’t ever get on one of these.

The max weight a ride should be is 120 lbs. That’s going to limit this bike to smaller kids or really really small adults. Keep in mind, though, that if your child is on the heavier side and closer to this 120 lb max weight, they aren’t going to get the full enjoyment out of a scooter like this. The closer to they are to the maximum weight range, the harder the scooter has to work and the faster it will wear out. They also might not be able to go as fast as others on a similar scooter. They should be on a scooter with a higher weight capacity so they can maximize their fun!

Operation of this particular scooter is fairly straightforward. With their right hand, they will operate the throttle with their thumb to go faster. To stop the scooter, they need to take their finger off the throttle as well as squeezing the brake with their left hand. All the speed controls are with the hands allowing for the rider to not have to worry about where to put their feet.

The maximum speed that this electric will get to is 10 mph. That may not seem like it’s very fast, but for a smaller child it will be. Try and monitor their comfort level and make sure that they don’t end up going out of control. Be extra mindful that if they start going down a hill their speed can pick up even more!

For most kids on this scooter, the ride time can be up to 80 minutes. That’s one of the best ride times of any electric scooter, kid or adult, on the market. Certainly long enough to accompany you on a long bike ride or to tool around the neighborhood on a summer’s night.

You may see other Razor options, such as the E100 or E125.  Those are all great Razor scooters and if they are your only choice then go ahead and get one. However, the PowerCore E90 is not only a newer, better model (with twice the ride time) but it’s also a lot cheaper than those other models. If I had to select just one Razor scooter for my kid, it’d be the PowerCore E90.

Hoverstar Electric Kick Scooter

Outside of the Razor world, there are a few kids-oriented electric scooter models that deserve your attention. One is this electric kick scooter from Hoverstar. At just $99 on Amazon, it’s also at a price that doesn’t hit the pocketbook too hard.

If you want a scooter that moves a little slower, then this is the one for your kid. With a max of only 6 mph, this scooter is perfect for the younger, or maybe, less adventurous kid. It also only has a range of roughly 5 miles, so there’s maybe 45 minutes of continuous riding possible with this model.

It can still hold a child up to 120 lbs which is pretty standard for child scooters. This is a potential scooter for the smaller child, or the fearful child. It still has plenty enough power and endurance to carry your smaller kid around for quite a long time!

Maxtra E100 Electric Scooter

This electric scooter is designed for the bigger kid, up to 160 lbs. It also runs a bit faster, with speeds reaching up to 12 mph. Be very mindful that with an electric scooter that has a higher speed there could be a tendency to try and push its limits. Don’t let your child run this down a hill. Just like with the discussion above on the Razor scooter, it can rapidly pick up its speed to dangerous levels where the brake is just not going to be much help.

One advantage to this particular scooter is the lack of a need to push start the scooter. Just push the accelerator button to get going! The tires are designed with punishing kid riders in mind. Not only are the tires made of pressurized rubber, but they are claimed to be puncture-proof! That eliminates so much of the potential maintenance for a scooter that will have the tendency to be ridden roughly by kids who are out to have a good time.

With five color choices, there’s a lot of variety to choose from! Easily foldable and weighing just 20 lbs, this particular scooter is easy to toss into the trunk of a car to take on a trip.

I would recommend this scooter for a child with a lot of room to grow. With the higher maximum weight capacity, your child could easily ride this scooter until his/her teenage years.

Scooter Accessories

Little kids are going to love to personalize their scooters, so adding items like stickers or decals to their scooter is going to be very popular!

I don’t believe that an electric scooter for a little kid should be equipped with lights because no little kid should be outside riding their scooter when lights are needed. However, you could add some under-deck LED light strips to jazz up the look of the scooter when it’s sitting in their room at night.

Again, don’t forget the safety equipment like a good helmet and possibly some protective elbow and knee pads!!

Conclusions

I love the idea of a small kid having a scooter. Most will have a ton of fun with it and it’s highly likely that at least a few of their friends will have one as well. You can certainly get a good quality electric scooter for around $100, and a solid helmet will cost another $10-15.

I think the best scooter for the money for kids is the Razor PowerCore E90, but the other scooters on this list are also good if the Razor isn’t available.

Make sure your kid is safe, rides supervised in a safe area, and always wears their helmet.

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